Andrés – Humble Artist by Day, Super Rock Superstar by Night

Heroes, Villains, and all that Jazz – Andrés

When you think of rock, who comes to mind? When you’re browsing through Spotify, or Apple Music, who comes up in your shuffle rotation? Forget your mainstream artists who release the same music and perform at those annual cringe-fests; you need some flavor in your life. You need a little funk, a little jazz, and a charming rock star to swoon over. Ladies and Gentlemen, allow me to introduce y’all to Andrés Aparicio.

My first exposure to Andrés began sometime last year, and the more I listened to his music, I could tell that Andrés was gonna be a rad up-and-coming artist. Once I managed to reach out to Andrés, I realized how much of a super down to earth guy he is, and with his sense of taste and style, I knew I’d love to ask him a few questions about his work.

Last year proved to be massively difficult for a lot of people, and it definitely took a toll on musicians who lost world tours, or performances at music festivals. I asked Andrés how last year went for him personally and as an artist. Andrés said, “Honestly, it was a breath of fresh air. I was stoked that I had plenty of time to write a new album!” Writing a new album is impressive, but that isn’t all that Andrés has been up to. Since 2020, Andrés has also managed to put out new original music, new merch (facemasks included), held some socially distanced performances, and even conducted his own Q&A session live on Instagram! Andrés managed to make the most of the year, as the chaotic year was a blessing in disguise in some ways. “To be completely honest, I’m very grateful for the break,” Andrés said. “I just want to use it as a time to write and record a new album and take the time to make new music videos.”

High School – Andrés

When it comes to music videos, Andrés has the most fun with it. A lot of his music videos are references to cool media from pop culture, like where Andrés dresses up as Archie Andrew and brings the whole gang from Riverdale to the movies in his music video for High School. He does another where his friends jam in a car in a That’s 70s Show style of fashion for his Bad Boy music video. His videos are fun, and you can tell the man has fun putting out content like this for his fans, both for the die-hard fans of his music and fans of the shows he dresses up for!

Archie and Fez aside, his alter egos aren’t the only things that make his music stand out. It really means something to me when another Latinx artist manages to delve into the rock music genre, and really rock at it. It’s more than inspiring; it really brings me hope for what music will be like for young kids that come from Latin heritage. I asked Andrés what it was like to sort of create a barrier-less genre and collaborate with former lead singer of the rock band Dance Gavin Dance not once, but twice.

“I just kept working hard at my own music, and eventually I gained the interest of a few fellow peers,” Andrés said. “Ultimately, it’s always been a process of working hard and putting out music that you’re proud of and working hard to promote it via shows, tours, videos, and the internet.”

Bad Boy – Andrés
New 52’s Teen Titans – Superboy, Wonder Girl, and Robin

After getting to listen to more and more of his music, I found myself jamming to his album Heroes, Villains, and all that Jazz the most. I wondered a few things; firstly, how fun would it be to wear a spandex supersuit for an album photoshoot? Secondly, how BIG of a superhero fan is Andrés?

I asked the hard questions; pulled zero punches. I asked what superhero team he’d prefer to have travel alongside him in a tour bus as a security team (hypothetically, you know, post-pandemic). His response?

“Man…Teen Titans all day. But, more importantly…Tim Drake as Red Robin, Cassie as Wonder Girl, and Conner Kent as Superboy. Those Teen Titans.” Andrés is a DC fan! That’s rad! “I’m a huge DC fan. Shit, Red Hood, Starfire, and Arsenal, that would be tight too.”

Hell yeah, it would! I also managed to ask Andrés if there are any upcoming projects or music that he’d be willing to tease. Turns out, he had something! That’s right, an exclusive here at Stars and Monsters! “I plan on releasing a new album this year! The DIY Astronaut!”

There you have it folks! Stay tuned for the new album by Andrés, The DIY Astronaut, and in the meantime, check out his music and merch here.

Jessa Furches: A Rising Star Among Us

I want to thank all of my readers who have supported Stars and Monsters and our blog site this far into the year. It began as a small endeavor to make use of a writer’s free time, and it became something more. Between discussions about books and comics to interviews with inspirational connections I’ve made, I knew there was nowhere else to go but up from here. Thankfully, that’s where we are headed now, thanks to my guest on this week’s blog post.

This week, I had the privilege of being able to interview someone very special; someone who has not only garnered so much internet fame and success in the music industry as an independent artist, but has also become an inspiration by fighting through dark battles, slandered reputations, and a chronic illness that has made living in a post-pandemic world a lot harder for her this year in 2020. Her name is Jessa Furches, of the singing duo, the Furches Twins.

Jessa Furches: A Star

Jessa and Gwynne, the Furches Twins

From Greensboro, North Carolina, Jessa and her twin sister Gwynne were both thrust into stardom and music at such a young age. When they were both only four years old, the Furches twins were brought into community theatre year after year, partaking in loads of different productions.

“The Wizard of Oz and the Music Man were always my favorite movies,” Jessa said, “and after I learned how to sing songs from the Wizard of Oz, we auditioned in community theatre productions for six years, and we did it until we were twelve years old.” They did Wizard of Oz every year, with Gwynne and Jessa both given identical roles as the Gatekeeper, having the two girls stand and walk side by side in unison. Audiences loved the twist in the character, and from there, the twins knew music was their calling.

Following those years, Jessa and her sister became victims of severely cruel bullying in middle school and high school. Between being made fun of for her body image, being called flat chested, or flat-assed, and being called too skinny, or ugly, nothing hurt Jessa more than being ridiculed and made fun of for her love of Michael Jackson. “People were not only mean to me, they were nasty,” Jessa described. “Around 2010, I had no group of friends to fit in with. The only ‘friends’ I had, told me I needed to eat cheeseburgers…they were the only friends I had because nobody else gave me a chance, and the ones we had bullied us.” There was little to no help given to the twins. Even when Jessa and her sister had to switch schools in the 8th grade in hopes of ending the bullying and harassment, nothing had changed. It got severely worse; it got so bad that Jessa and Gwynne had to fake an entire fight with each other during gym glass so they would be suspended and leave school. It was what they needed to do to get out of the awful environment. “One of the preppy, popular students encouraged the other students to yell and shout nasty, incestuous remarks about us, about my sexuality, and about my issues with my own self-harm. They’d target me when I was alone, asking ‘What do you like to do, cut yourself?'” This was something Jessa struggled with for the entirety of her teen years, up until she was 18 years old. By the time high school came around, kids were only more cruel.

One of the things that got Jessa through the harsh mean girls and hating trolls of those adolescent years was the fact that her twin sister, Gwynne, was by her side. “I vividly remember a guy who’d bully us in a class with Gwynne and I, where him and three other guys got the whole class to say ‘You don’t belong here! You need to go back to where you came from!’ And Gwynne and I just sat next to each other. Having each other made it easier for sure.” The bond that Jessa and Gwynne share, not only as twins, but as friends, is something that has saved these twins time and time again. Seeing their love and loyalty to one another brought tears to my eyes as we discussed Jessa’s childhood growing up.

Jessa and I went on to talk about what motivated and inspired her. “I adored Michael Jackson’s music,” Jessa said. “See, when I was ten, my dad left us. It was a huge blessing in disguise, to not have him around. He left a woman who loved him for 14 years and her two chronically-ill children, so I’d be inclined to agree as well. Jessa went on, explaining how her role model shifted when Michael Jackson’s Thriller came on the radio one night. “My mom was all like, ‘Listen to this! He is a legend!'” Jessa’s mother began to share all of his different albums with her and Gwynne, and played all of his music videos for them. Michael Jackson and everything he was became a safe haven for Jessa. “I’d cry by his posters, wondering why he’d gone, and my mother would hold me and, with tears in her eyes, she’d say ‘Listen to Michael; Keep the faith.'” He was always meant to be placed in her path, and it was Jessa’s single mother who gave her someone great to look up to.

Michael continues to be one of Jessa’s biggest influences in her music career. From when she was just starting out in choir, taking after Jackson himself to not sight-read sheet music, to drawing vocal influences in her music and covers of pop songs and classic ballads, her stylistic voice is what got Jessa and her sister the internet fame and stardom that launched their music career. They started uploading to YouTube, creating singing videos, and gained a following. By 2015, the Furches Twins had 100k subscribers on YouTube channel, and a combined Instagram follower count of over 900,000 followers. The two had garnered so much recognition from their music covers on social media, the twins were even able to sign with a record label in North Carolina called Othaz Records. Since then, Jessa has managed to begin writing and creating her own original music as a solo unsigned music artist, with new music available on YouTube, iTunes, and Spotify.

Gwynne Furches – My Other Half

Jessa, Gwynne, and their Mother

When Jessa told me about her music endeavors as a solo artist, I asked about her sister, Gwynne. After a traumatic vehicular car accident that cost someone their life last year, Gwynne was charged with a felony, and it shook the Furches family in ways that are almost beyond words. When asked about the night Jessa got the news of the incident, she said, “I didn’t know what was going on. My girlfriend at the time woke me up, because I was asleep. I was confused, and went to the hospital and received the tragic news.” As we talked, I realized we were dredging up memories that were best left alone, but Jessa faced this heartbreaking event in her life, and she reaffirmed that she was willing to confront this with me during the interview. She asked me to include the following statement from her:

“I, myself, and Gwynne as well, know what she has done, and she made a horrible mistake, but it was an accident. She’s willing to do whatever she has to do, however amount of times, for the family of who was hurt. I support my sister, but I do not support her actions on that night.”

With that, I ask my readers to be kind, considerate, and continue to help each other move passed horrible traumas, regardless of what they may be. As I told Jessa, 2020 has been a year that’s required so much reevaluation and insight into ourselves, that even facing the most discomforting moments are meant to better us and, eventually, others around us.

Admittedly, I shed a few tears as Jessa and I talked about her sister. As someone who has an older sister, I dread the possibility of losing her. With Jessa’s sister also being her twin, I wondered if, despite everything, she still feels as close to her sister as before. “I will always feel close to her,” she said, “no matter where she’s at. She is my other half. I cannot think of one moment when my world fell apart…other than that horrible tragedy that could have been prevented.”

With all of these sudden changes in Jessa’s life, between what changed for her personally, and the sudden changes that took place in our world this year, 2020 was all around a drastic shift in perspective and awareness. Jessa mentioned her desire to go and help make a difference with recent protests for the Black Lives Matter movement, to the racial conflicts and broken tension in the nation, and the dangers of the COVID-19 pandemic. As I mentioned, she and her sister have chronic illnesses. “With cystic fibrosis, being immunocompromised makes things difficult for me,” she mentioned, “it’s hard to go to the grocery store, or go to work, and it’s been even harder because of the conflicts going on right now. I wish I could go and protest so much. I asked about her condition, and whether the pandemic has caused any issues in getting treatment. Thankfully, Jessa is still able to treat her cystic fibrosis twice a day, for twenty minutes a day. Because of her condition, however, leaving her home becomes quite difficult. Thankfully, her mother has been able to remind her to continue to move forward day in and day out. “‘You’ve got to keep going’ she’d always say. It’s why I won’t give up on this; the Black Lives Matter movement, the fight against COVID-19, the bullying and conflicts. It’s why I’ve continued to make music.”

One of Us

Sweet Sisters

So much lies within Jessa Furches. Between her passions and love that she brings into the world, and her adoration of legends like Michael Jackson, Whitney Houston, and Marilynn Monroe, she continues to forge success triumphantly. “Marilynn Monroe was trying to be taken seriously as an actress instead of a sex symbol. I myself want to be taken seriously as a singer, and not just a sex symbol. In that regard, I see myself in her, but I began to make money selling my photos of myself and other NSFW content.” In a post-pandemic world, jobs have become more difficult to come by, and whether it’s the new gig-economy that saves our asses, or the success of platforms like OnlyFans, people need lucrative ways to maintain sustainable income. For Jessa, it was more about empowerment for herself more than anything else. “Of course it’s empowering. It’s less about the money, but it has been good to save up for my family and such. The money doesn’t bring me happiness; the rich that comes from it means nothing when it feels like nobody cares about you.”

That’s the stigma with OnlyFans, it seems like. More people seem to have a lot more to say about empowered women taking advantage of a platform that allows them to profit off of their own body and image while maintaining ownership of their work, but keep quiet about the pornographic sites that exploit women and content without any accountability for those who steal from content creators and abuse platforms that way. Just my two cents as a fellow content creator.

Anyway, I lastly wanted to share a final word from Jessa Furches, who was so kind enough to say to my readers.

“I want whoever is taking the time to read my story, who may be a little inspired, or feel like they can relate to, we all deserve love, and we all deserve to be accepted. I ask that you all take care of each other, take care of yourselves, and wear a mask. I’m compromised with cystic fibrosis, and it’s BORING, and it’s lonely. Always worry about your families, friends, those around you, including your pets, and God bless all of you. So much love, no matter where you are, and who you are, and stay safe.”

I agree. Be sure to follow Jessa Furches on Instagram, YouTube, and OnlyFans, and check out her single, L.O.V.E, available on iTunes and Spotify now. If you’re a longtime fan of hers, then y’all will be pleased to hear, exclusively here at Stars and Monsters, that she’s got an upcoming new single being released sometime in November 27th, titled Seeing is Believing.

And, again folks, stay safe, and stay lovely to one another.

Interview with Lexie Marie – Influencer to Human Rights Advocate

S: I just wanted to start off by asking you to sort of introduce yourself. You and I are good friends, but there are a handful of readers who might not know you, so this will be for them.

L: My name is Alexis, but I’m primarily known as Lexie Marie. For those of you who don’t know, I consider myself to be a social media influencer, but for the most part I’m just a regular girl with big goals and dreams, and I’m motivated with a huge passion to bring change in this world.

S: Since you’ve been active as Lexie Marie online, you’ve garnered a bit of a fanbase, you know? People don’t just follow you, but there are a lot of people who are influenced by your style, looks, and trend-setting vlog posts on YouTube. Do you feel as though your social media influence can make a big positive impact?

L: I definitely feel like my social media influence can make a significant impact! I want to be able to inspire my fans to be whatever they want to be. I want to inspire them to not be afraid, and to be their unique selves. I want to use my voice and platform to promote & raise awareness on the Black Lives Matter movement, LGBTQ+ rights, immigration reform, and especially help give voice to victims and survivors of sexual assault. 

S: I’m glad you’re mentioning more than one way of making a positive impact. Lately, it feels as though some issues get drowned out by the sound of the next viral movement.

L: I would rather be known as a girl who cares about the world than the girl in it for the fame and money. I know what my intentions are.

S: The power of intention is real. Especially now, because things are really intense in the world right now, with a lot of very bad and heinous things happening. It’s a worldwide awakening, and there’s a movement for just about every injustice that our oppressors need to be held accountable for. What’s one that you’re looking to bring change to?

L: Human rights for everyone is something that we cannot ignore right now. That being said, justice needs to be served for the black community; the black community continues to suffer and fight for their lives every day. We also need to be more accepting towards the LGBTQ+ community and learn that we are not different from the other, and that everybody is equal. Families are being separated and destroyed at the U.S. border as well. All of these things are always happening, and we need to support these oppressed victims. One thing that I do intend on bringing change to is sexual violence, not just against women, but against men as well. That includes sexual assault, sexual harassment, sexual abuse, etc. I believe that our victims of sexual violence do not get the recognition or voice that they deserve. It’s something that should be taken very seriously, and there aren’t enough people trying to normalize having this necessary conversation. It can cause a lifetime of pain, suffering, and trauma to one’s mind and body. We need to wake up, open our eyes, and do better for each other.

S: Yes, we need to do better for our brothers and sisters right now. All of the abuse and violence against minorities and survivors of sexual assault needs to end now. Sexual assault is a painful thing for us both to talk about; “My Body, My Choice” is something that comes to mind when I think of consent with my body. Do you think there is more to the idea behind “My Body, My Choice”?

L: I definitely do believe there is so much more to the idea of “My Body, My Choice”. Of course, the main thing is that it supports the idea of having the option to have an abortion or not, and I also believe it has a lot to do with consent, body positivity, and sexuality. It helps women to be free from pretty much everything society tells them not to do. For example, if you’re an exotic dancer or stripper, you’re automatically considered a whore. If you sleep with a handful of men, people will say you don’t have dignity or self respect for yourself, and call you a slut; these are just a bunch of judgmental and toxic views against women that needs to change. It’s 2020, I think our views against women should’ve changed a long time ago. ❤️

S: I agree, we have come so far, and we should continue to progress forward rather than regress backwards in 2020. Letting go of the shaming and the labeling is a great first step to doing so. There needs to be an active change in how women are ridiculed, and how we need to stop silencing women’s voices. Before we wrap up, I noticed there was a new non-profit you started promoting on your Instagram. Tell us about it.

L: It’s called RAINN, and it stands for Rape, Abuse, & Incest National Network; It’s the largest anti-sexual violence organization ever constructed. It is created to help survivors/victims who suffer from any form of sexual violence by providing counseling services, important information which can also educate the public more about the topic, as well as provides a hotline to those who are in need of aid after an assault, or for those who want to help loved ones. I think it’s important that we get Involved with RAINN, help donate, and bring awareness to those who suffer everyday from these kinds of things. You’ll never know whose life you might help or change, and making a change is absolutely a good feeling.


She’s right. There is a lot that needs to be done before we move forward. The oppression, the abuse, the suffering that is being inflicted on us needs to come to an end. Obviously, writing about this can only do so much. Reading about these things doesn’t do enough for change, but it starts with you and me. Remember, there is no activism without self-activism.

Learn more about RAINN here.

Follow Lexie on her YouTube, Instagram, or Twitter.

Stay safe, folks, and please, be kind to one another.